Broadway Love

So your bucket list includes hearing Broadway arrangements of Tupac Shakur’s greatest hits? Have I got news for you. Currently underway in New York City is a workshop for Holler If Ya Hear Me, a musical based on the works of Tupac Shakur.

Directed by Kenny Leon, whose recent work includes helming Fences, The Mountaintop, and Stick Fly, the musical is in the very early stages of development. Like most “jukebox” musicals, the story is original, not biographical, so there will probably not be anyone playing Tupac, either in person or as a hologram.

This will not the be first run of hip hop on Broadway. The 2008 production of In the Heights featured songs inspired by hip hop. That production went on to win multiple Tony Awards, including Best Musical and Best Score. Here’s some of In the Heights:

The Book of Mormon: How to Talk Dirty and Get Away With It

behindthescenes_header

We’re excited to publish the second installment of Behind the Scenes, a 3-part blog series from one of theatre’s most celebrated journalists and critics. In the same vein as Inside the Huddle, this series will provide an expert perspective that’s uniquely personal, focused around the stories and passion at the heart of fan experiences. 

The Book of Mormon,” which swept up nine Tony Awards two years ago, including Best Musical, is an object lesson in How to Talk Dirty and Get Away With It.

How?

Why, by making mock of everything, including AIDS, female circumcision, rape, racism, assassination, and God. All this in a make-believe Uganda, where two young (white) missionaries from Salt Lake City, USA — fat and fumbling Elder Cunningham (Josh Gad) and lean mean Elder Price (Andrew Rammels) have come to spread the good word of Joseph Smith and the Latter Day Saints   A feminine warmth and softness is supplied by the welcoming Nabulungi (Nikki M. James).

BroadwaySign282x672

The Book of Mormon originally debuted on Broadway in 2011

All this is the handiwork of Trey Parker and Matt Stone, smart-set masterminds of television’s animated “South Park,” plus book and music by Robert Lopez (co-creator of 2003′s Tony-winning “Avenue Q”) — with choreography by Casey Nicholaw. The whole works comes directed by Lopez and Nicholaw.

“Mormon,” touted by some reviewers as the greatest, funniest musical ever to reach Broadway, has been packing in the onlookers ever since — despite or because of the warning: “Contains explicit language and sensitive themes throughout” — though anyone with a memory that reaches as far back as 1962 will vividly remember the truly funniest “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum,” in which the only gods were Roman ones plus the huge, immortal Zero Mostel as Pseudolus the Slave in a pornographic frieze.

One wonders what a certain prominent 2012 political candidate and Mormon would have said of the goings-on in “The Book of Mormon.” Unlikely that we’ll ever know. Sensitive and explicit were not exactly that gentleman’s pursuits. It is a Latter Day than you think, Sir. Just ask Joseph Smith.

The original “Mormon” production opened in 2011 at the Eugene O’Neill Theatre and continually plays to a packed house this summer. You can also catch the show this summer at venues around the world, including Cleveland, Chicago, D.C., and London.

Roger Maxwell is the pen name of a journalist and critic who has been writing about theatre for more than 50 years. He was one of the founders of The Village Voice, where he created the Off-Broadway “OBIE” awards and was an early recipient of the George Jean Nathan award in drama criticism. His beat now is culture and politics for The Villager.

Matilda The Musical: There’s a child in the best of all of us, isn’t there?

behindthescenes_header

This month, we’re excited to introduce Behind the Scenes, a 3-part blog series from one of theatre’s most celebrated journalists and critics. In the same vein as Inside the Huddle, this series will provide an expert perspective that’s uniquely personal, focused around the stories and passion at the heart of fan experiences. 

If you have brains, prepare to use them now.

That would be the battle cry from the Shubert Theatre on West 44th Street, where the 60-year war against intelligence-numbing television — “the telly” in this show’s British original — is being waged, irresistibly, by a rotating foursome of 11-year-old female children alternating as one 5-year-old stunner named Matilda Wormwood.

Their weapons, her weapons, are books — written words — like the intellectually militant 1988 children’s novel by the late Roald Dahl from which Danny DeVito crafted a 1996 film and the Royal Shakespeare Company created “Matilda the Musical” three years ago. It has nothing whatsoever to do with the WW II Australian marching song “Waltzing Matilda.”

Evidently there are a few intellects this side of the water too, judging by the way that “Matilda the Musical” has been packing them in since its opening this past April on Broadway.

Seating Map for Shubert Theatre.

Seating Chart for Shubert Theatre.

“Wormwood” is the unfortunate but fitting name of Matilda’s father, a boorish London used-car  salesman whose wife, the globe-trotting Mrs. Wormwood, Matilda’s mother, is of even lower intellectual caliber. But the main monster of the piece is school principal Miss Trunchbull, played to a tea by British comedian and female impersonator Bertie Carvel. If you can remember horrible Nurse Ratched of “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” well, Miss Trunchbull is Nurse Ratched reborn.

Counterbalancing the fearsome Miss Trunchbull is, of course, a lovely, sympathetic book-reading teacher, Miss Honey, played by Lauren Ward. The four young actresses who give us Matilda herself are Sophia Gennusa, Oona Laurence, Bailey Ryon, and Milly Shapiro. The real hero of this show may be its children’s musical director, Deborah Abramson. Certainly the enraptured witnesses would vote for her.

But everything begins with the book — not the Roald Dahl novel but the words and structure of the entire stage show. They and it are by the RSC’s Dennis Kelly, son of a North London bus driver.

Its music and lyrics are by British-born Australian comedian, composer, pianist, rock-’n'-roller, chief cook and bottle-washer Tim Minchin. Directing the whole shebang is the ever-busy Matthew Warchus. The choreography is by that Peter Darling who did such miracles with the rotating youngsters of Broadway’s “Billy Eliott” five years ago.

Performances of the musical begin June 11th at Shubert Theatre, the flagship theater of the Shubert chain, which opened October 21, 1913 with a London production of Bernard Shaw’s “Caesar and Cleopatra.” It has since housed hundreds of hit plays and musicals, but none more telling than Joaseph Papp and Michael Bennett’s Public Theater transfer of “A Chorus Line,” which ran at the Shubert for 15 years, from October 19, 1975, to April 28, 1990.

So okay, call this “Matilda” the children’s crusade. There’s something of a child in the best of all of us, isn’t there? Just ask the lucky witnesses who get to see — and hear — the show-and-tell at the Shubert these nights.

Roger Maxwell is the pen name of a journalist and critic who has been writing about theatre for more than 50 years. He was one of the founders of The Village Voice, where he created the Off-Broadway “OBIE” awards and was an early recipient of the George Jean Nathan award in drama criticism. His beat now is culture and politics for The Villager.

Holiday Insider Tips for NYC

The holidays are here and New York is a beacon that draws people to the city during this time. We’ve highlighted the best things NYC has to offer, including restaurant and bar recommendations, hot holiday shows, New Year’s Eve ideas and more. From the our family to yours, Happy Holidays!

Giving Thanks for the High Kick

Thanksgiving Parade Balloons

I was easily amused as a kid.

Growing up, the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade was rather the big deal around my house. There were different reasons for this. I, the adolescent boy, was more interested in the balloons of the superheroic persuasion, and, of course, the “seasonal inaugural appearance” of the big man himself. This was the mid ’80s, so the Christmas season hadn’t quite been dialed back to November 1st yet. Between balloons, my sheltie and I amused ourselves or checked on the early stages of Thanksgiving dinner preparation.

If we were both good, we got pieces of ham.

Now, those bits I skipped included the floats trucking that season’s selection of pop stars and impending fall TV failures through the streets of NYC, as well as showcases of Broadway performers. Each year a few of the shows on Broadway get to do one number. Usually these are picked from the shows that debuted that year. This year you’ll get to see:

Now, of paramount importance to certain family members was always the final Broadway performance of the Parade: The Rockettes.

My mom, aunt, and one of her kids were really into dance, so the Rockettes were always a big deal. Being way before the Rockettes really did any touring, there wasn’t any other opportunity to see them without going to Radio City Music Hall, so the Parade was “must-see-TV”. So, when they arrived on screen, the call would go out, and the family would gather in front of the TV to watch the ladies line up and kick.

Fortunately, the Rockettes and their Christmas Spectacular get around a little more these days. For many recent seasons a touring company of Rockettes have put the show on around the country, while the NYC team keeps the seats filled at Radio City. The amount of cities they visit varies year to year, but it certainly makes it easier to catch the Christmas Spectacular without having to solely rely on a single number in the Macy’s Parade.